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Ollerton Town 

Est. 1988

Venue

The Lane, Welfare Sports Ground, Walesby Lane, New Ollerton Tel: 0787 6255814

Ground Capacity

2000

Home Strip

 Away Strip

Seating 200

Record Attendance

225 v Sheffield United - Friendly - August 2006
Who are ya? Town
What Division are you in? Step 7 - Central Midland Supreme Division
Websites www.ollertontownfc.co.uk (Official site)
www.freewebs.com/ollertontownfc

 

You must have come in a taxi

  From North - Exit A1 at junction at with A57 (Worksop) & A617. Take 3rd exit for the A614 (Olllerton) for 6.6 miles. Take 1st exit at roundabout for A6075 (New Ollerton), then take 1st exit at next roundabout onto Walesby Lane. The Ground is 0.3 miles on the LHS. Providing the gates are open, there is ample car parking space, otherwise it's street parking.

From East - Exit A1 at Tuxford, following the A6075 (Ollerton). Continue on the A6075 thourgh New Ollerton for 6.4 miles. Just before the first roundabout, turn right into Walesby Lane. The Ground is 0.3 miles on the LHS. Providing the gates are open, there is ample car parking space, otherwise it's street parking.

From Mansfield - Take the A60 out of town, then the A6075 (Ollerton) for 9.4 miles. Take 3rd exit at roundabout for A6075 (New Ollerton), then take 1st exit after next roundabout onto Walesby Lane. The Ground is 0.3 miles on the LHS. Providing the gates are open, there is ample car parking space, otherwise it's street parking.

From Nottingham - Take the A60 (Mansfield) for 4.8miles. At roundabout, take the A614 for 14 miles. Take 4th exit at roundabout for A6075 (New Ollerton), then take 1st exit at next roundabout onto Walesby Lane. The Ground is 0.3 miles on the LHS. Providing the gates are open, there is ample car parking space, otherwise it's street parking.

   East Midlands Stagecoach - No.13 (Wellow - Mansfield Bus Station), No.15 (Walesby - Mansfield Bus Station & No.33 (Nottingham Victoria Bus Station - Worksop) all run past Walesby Lane.

   Mansfield Woodhouse - 8.5 miles

For a map of the location, Click here.

 

My garden shed is bigger than this

In the very heart of Robin Hood Country, you will find the town of Ollerton. Were Mr Hood to descend upon his old stomping ground today, he wouldn't recognise the place. The town has grew from a tiny hamlet into a major colliery town, housing people from Wales, Scotland and the North East. Sadly, the pit has long since gone, but the colliery has left behind a significant legacy. Yes, the most famous man to wear green tights would surely be proud of the work that has been done down at The Lane to provide his descendents with a football club to be proud of - Ollerton Town Football Club.

There is a long history of local football in Ollerton dating back to the late 1800's. When the colliery opened in the 1920's, Town's predecessor, Ollerton Colliery Football Club, was formed. The best period for the colliery side was immediately prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, with the Reserve's capturing the Notts Intermediate Cup in 1936/37, and then the following year tthe senior's won the Notts Senior Cup.

The Miner's strike in 1984, and a death to a Miner during the unrest, saw the end of Ollerton Colliery Football Club, during a turbulent period for the town. However, they were reformed in 1988 as Ollerton Bevercotes Miners Welfare Football Club and entered the Mansfield Bitter League. In 1991, The club entered the Notts Football Alliance and were Division Two Champions within two years. Following the closure of the colliery in 1994, a decision was taken to rename the team Ollerton Town. However, the club still maintain it's links with it's past, as a section of Ollerton Bevercotes Miners Welfare. It pledges to represent the whole community of Ollerton, just as its predecessors, Ollerton Colliery, had done.

The first taste of success for the newly formed club came in 1996, when they won the Notts Alliance First Division. The ambitions of the Club saw a move to the Central Midlands League at the turn of the millennium. Having joined the National Pyramid of Football the success story continued, capturing the CML Premier Division title and reaching the final of the Notts F.A. Senior Cup in 2008.

The ambitions of the Club are clearly visible upon arriving at The Lane in the form of the Club's splendidly constructed spectator stand. The Stand, built in 2001, is dedicated to the memory of former players Wayne Brewin and Peter Abram, and was officially opened by former England star, Des Walker, in front of a then record crowd of over 200. Touchingly, the names of Wayne & Peter are embedded in the brick work of The Stand. A factor which helped finance the building work was the supporters generosity in buying commemorative bricks bearing their own names, which have then been set into the rear of the stand. Not one to miss an opportunity, the Club can still arrange for inscribed bricks to added. The stand can accommodate 200 spectators, and has an interesting roof that is raised at the front, in keeping with the Club's dugouts.

The sturdy, white painted dug outs are located on the White water Road side of the ground. As previously mentioned, the high roofs on each rise towards the front, and these can easily accommodate the tallest of folk. The pitch is surrounded by dozens of permanent metal poles and a white painted rail in line with CML requirements.

Ollerton is literally a mixture of new and old. Old Ollerton is given mention in the Doomsday Book. In New Ollerton, where the colliery headstocks once stood, is now the site of the massive Sherwood Energy Village, a 4m, 91-acre scheme  to create an environmentally sustainable development of houses, industry, public space and visitor attractions. The same scenario applies at The Lane. Whilst the Club's stand represents the new, there are quite a few items by the main entrance which could equally have been named in the Doomsday book. This maybe a little harsh, as the various shaped buildings, metal posts and an old cricket sight screen certainly provide variety. The changing rooms are houses within a bright blue porter cabin style building, whilst the Clubhouse stands out for it's a distinctive triangular roof. An eye catching feature is the concrete turnstile at the entrance to the ground, which contains a lonely looking plastic chair within. Interestingly, the corrugated roof is raised at the front, in line with the Stand and dugouts.

The entire site is surrounded by an eight foot high steel fence to keep out trespasses. The vast recreational area is also home to Ollerton Cricket Club, whose . The site was also shared by Ollerton Rugby Club up until a few years ago, after a resident of Main road complained about rugby balls going into his garden.  Behind the dugouts, the Football Club have erected high fencing to avoid the loss of too many balls to the very close by  residents on Whitewater Road. It would be strongly advised for the Club to play their football on the deck in order to avoid a similar fate.

Future Plans

Town are presently installing floodlights whcih should be in place by the start of the 2007/08 season.

 

Addtional Photography

                               

         

      Click on a thumbnail to view a full size picture.

Christopher Rooney - permission required for photo & text usage

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